Grene Vision Group Expands Oculoplastics

By Amy Geiszler-Jones
Tuesday, December 25, 2018

With the addition of a second ophthalmologist specializing in oculofacial plastic surgery, Grene Vision Group has expanded its capacity to serve patients who require eyelid, orbit, tear duct, and facial cosmetic and reconstructive surgery.


Dr. Samuel Amstutz, Dr. Rao Chundury and the technicians who work on the Oculoplastics team at Grene Vision Group.

In August, Rao V. Chundury, MD, MBA, joined the Wichita-based practice, which is one of the largest doctor-owned eye care practices in the U.S. Dr. Chundury cited a primary reason he joined the practice was the chance to work alongside Samuel W. Amstutz, MD, who was the first oculofacial plastic surgeon in the Wichita area. Dr. Amstutz joined Grene Vision Group in 1985, after his oculoplastics fellowship in Detroit. He has developed a reputation as a meticulous, even artful, surgeon.

Their training and experience allows Drs. Chundury and Amstutz to provide premier care for both common and complex cases. Board-certified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, both have completed training through American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) accredited fellowships. ASOPRS is the world’s largest medical organization of surgeons dedicated to the health and beauty of the periorbital region and face, according to the ASOPRS website.

Dr. Chundury completed his fellowship in aesthetic and reconstructive oculofacial surgery at the Cleveland Clinic Cole Eye Institute two and a half years ago.

“I was very lucky to participate in the care of very complex patients, including facial transplant recipients. Typically, these patients needed multidisciplinary care,” Dr. Chundury says.

Dr. Chundury, who is also board-certified by ASOPRS, graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in biology and earned his master’s, medical and business degrees from Indiana University School of Medicine and Kelley School of Business in Indianapolis. He completed his residency at Saint Louis University where he was Chief Resident. Dr. Chundury came to Grene Vision Group from Indianapolis, where he was an Assistant Professor and Associate Residency Program Director at Indiana University. He has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles and presented novel research at national meetings.


Rao V. Chundury, MD, MBA, and Samuel W. Amstutz, MD

The pair provide services at five Grene Vision Group locations in Wichita and Hutchinson, as well as trauma services at Wichita’s Level I trauma centers.

Eyelids perform an essential function of protecting the eyes, but a drooping eyelid (ptosis) can significantly compromise a patient’s field of vision. Tear ducts function to drain excess tears, but constant tearing from a blockage can blur vision. A patient with benign essential blepharospasm may be completely visually incapacitated.

“That’s where we come in — to make sure the supportive environment for each eye (eyelids and orbit) is working optimally,” Dr. Amstutz says. In the case of a patient suffering orbital or facial trauma, the doctors’ goal is to repair and/or reconstruct appropriately to save and restore vision.

Occasionally, an eye/periocular examination will uncover a serious underlying medical situation. For instance, as Dr. Amstutz examined a patient presenting with eye exposure changes due to a presumed Bell’s palsy, he noted asymmetry in the level of upper and lower face weakness. Only after a third MRI of the temporal region could a recurrent invasive subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma be identified.

Both doctors are determined to provide the best possible care for the best outcomes, they say, from a blocked tear duct to orbital and facial trauma. Other frequently performed procedures include the removal of excess eyelid skin and fat (blepharoplasty), droopy eyelids (ptosis), in-turning eyelids (entropion) and out-turning eyelids (ectropion).

Oculofacial plastic surgery requires precise care and attention to detail, taking each individual patient’s situation into consideration and applying well-developed surgical concepts, Dr. Amstutz says. “There may be routine cases, but no two cases are alike.”

“The eyebrow, eyelid and mid-face are a continuum. Having an intimate knowledge of how each area affects the other can maximize the success of surgery while minimizing the risks,” Dr. Chundury adds.

“We also work collaboratively with other physicians, such as plastic surgeons, ear/nose/throat specialists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons and occasionally, neurosurgeons,” Dr. Amstutz says. “Our goal is to enhance the care other physicians can provide to their patients, giving them more diagnostic specificity, ultimately providing better care and outcomes to their patients.”

Grene Vision Group Covers All Eye Care, All Over Kansas

Grene Vision Group is one of the largest doctor-owned eye care groups in the U.S., with 13 ophthalmologists, 36 optometrists and more than 365 opticians, technicians and support staff who work in 21 clinics in 14 Kansas communities.

The practice provides total eye care for the entire family and covers all primary, medical and surgical services. The 13 ophthalmologists at Grene Vision Group and their sub-specialties are:


Samuel W. Amstutz, MD
  • Functional and cosmetic eyelid surgery
  • Tear duct and orbital disorders

Anita Campbell, MD
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS)

David M. Chacko, MD, PhD
  • Diseases and surgery of the vitreous and retina
  • Macular degeneration
  • Diabetic retinopathy

Rao V. Chundury, MD, MBA
  • Functional and cosmetic eyelid surgery
  • Eyelid and orbital trauma
  • Tear duct and orbital disorders

Dasa V. Gangadhar, MD
  • Corneal transplantation
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Cornea and external disease

Alan R. Hromas, MD
  • Diseases and surgery of the vitreous and retina
  • Macular degeneration
  • Diabetic retinopathy

Michele M. Riggins, MD
  • Neuro-ophthalmology
  • Adult strabismus
  • Blepharospasm

Donald B. Scrafford, MD
  • General ophthalmology
  • Medical eye care
  • Eye exams/contact lenses

Brian H. Strange, MD
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Cosmetic and functional eyelid surgery
  • General ophthalmology

David T. Truong, MD
  • Cornea and external disease
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Laser vision correction

Mark L. Wellemeyer, MD
  • Laser vision correction
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Refractive lens surgery

Charles R. Whitfill, MD
  • Pediatric ophthalmology
  • Pediatric cataracts
  • Pediatric oculoplastics

Terria L. Winn, MD
  • Cataract and implant surgery
  • Refractive lens surgery
  • Laser surgery

Home Accident Causes Double Vision; Delicate Surgery Repairs It

When Ben Haddock took a brutal blow to his right eye during a renovation project, he prayed that the accident wouldn’t cost him the eyesight he relied upon to make a living for his family.


Ben Haddock regained his vision after surgery by Samuel W. Amstutz, MD. Haddock experienced a brutal blow to his right eye during a home renovation project that caused a blowout fracture and severe vision loss.

Because of his wife’s diligence, a referral by a respected ophthalmologist and the skill of a Grene Vision Group oculofacial surgeon, those prayers were answered.

Haddock was tearing down a small shed in the backyard of his Derby, Kansas, home when part of the metal holding up a roll-style garage door broke off and whacked him hard in his eye. The noise of the metal tearing away and hitting him was loud enough to get the attention of his neighbor, who’d just returned to his home after talking with Haddock, and his wife who was elsewhere in the backyard.

An emergency room doctor at Wesley Derby ER assured Haddock he wouldn’t lose his eye, before sending him to Wesley Medical Center in Wichita. Blunt force trauma can break the bones of the eye socket (orbit), leading to what’s called a blow-out fracture, which is the diagnosis Haddock received. The force of the impact radiates backward and fractures the bones, some of which are paper thin.

Sometimes patients don’t require surgery to repair the fracture. Initially, doctors told Haddock he wouldn’t need to undergo surgery. But his wife, Susan, insisted he needed to see specialists during the days following the accident. Haddock was experiencing severe double vision and couldn’t move his eye.

“He couldn’t look at anyone directly,” Susan recalls.

As a numerical control CATIA programmer who creates tools used in the aircraft industry, Haddock needed his vision restored.

“It was a dire situation,” he says. “I need my binocular vision to do my job. And my eyesight was getting worse.”

With Susan at his side, Haddock visited an oral/maxillofacial specialist and then ophthalmologist Paul Weishaar, MD, with Vitreo-Retinal Consultants in Wichita. Dr. Weishaar, whom Haddock says he has a lot of respect for, referred Haddock to Samuel Amstutz, MD, an expert in oculofacial plastic surgery with Grene Vision Group.

A CT scan revealed that a small bone shard had impaled a muscle behind the eyeball. Dr. Amstutz recommended surgery to remove the bone and told Haddock he could schedule that within a day or two. It was going to be a delicate surgery, requiring Dr. Amstutz to make an incision and get behind Haddock’s eyeball to remove the shard.

“I’m kind of skeptical when it comes to surgeries, but Dr. Amstutz was very calm, told me he had done several of these surgeries in his career and that he was going to make time to get me into surgery,” Haddock says. “I realized it was his way of telling me I needed to have this done right away.”

As he opened his eyes after surgery, Haddock realized the pressure he had felt around his eye after the accident was gone.

“Dr. Amstutz is a very, very good surgeon,” Haddock says. “He did such a fantastic job. I didn’t feel any pain like I have with other surgeries, not even where the incision was, and there wasn’t any more pressure.” Haddock notes the incision scar in the crease of his eyelid is barely visible.

With the bone removed and subsequent eye exercises, the swelling went down, the muscle was rehabilitated and Haddock’s normal vision returned.

“I am very pleased and happy,” Haddock says.

Grene Vision Group offers premier medical and surgical eye care from a specialized team of board-certified ophthalmologists.

  • Adult strabismus
  • Amblyopia treatment
  • Blepharoplasty
  • Blepharospasm
  • Blocked tear ducts
  • Cataract & implant surgery
  • Cornea & external disease
  • Corneal collagen cross-linking
  • Corneal transplantation
  • Cosmetic & functional oculofacial surgery
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Diseases & surgery of the vitreous & retina
  • Double vision & eye muscle disorders
  • Eye emergency services
  • Eye exams
  • Eyelid & orbital trauma
  • Eyelid cancer
  • Eye muscle surgery
  • Functional & cosmetic eyelid surgery
  • General ophthalmology
  • Glaucoma
  • Hemifacial spasm
  • Laser surgery
  • Laser vision correction
  • Macular degeneration
  • Neuro-ophthalmology
  • Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation
  • Optic nerve disorders
  • Pediatric cataracts
  • Pediatric oculoplastics
  • Pediatric ophthalmology
  • Refractive lens surgery
  • Tear duct & orbital disorders
  • Thyroid eye disease
  1. A. Multiple severe left upper and lower eyelid full thickness lacerations including both the upper and lower tear drain system. Repair required multilayered closure with tear duct intubation. B. Final outcome with preservation of eyelid muscles and functioning tear duct system.
  2. A. Upper eyelid tarsal plate disinsertion laceration with tear duct involvement. Repair required multilayered closure with lid crease fixation sutures, eyelid muscle repair and tear duct intubation. B. Final outcome with favorable lid height and contour.
  3. A. Severe thyroid eye disease (Graves hyperthyroidism) resulting in proptosis, inability to close the eye secondary to eyelid retraction, and corneal dryness. A two-walled, internal incision, orbital decompression with ethmoidectomy was performed. B. Final outcome with much improve proptosis, upper eyelid retraction and eye closure.
  4. A. Upper eyelid blepharoptosis resulting in superior visual field deficit. Repair was performed via graded internal ptosis repair technique (No external incisions). B. Favorable height and contour one week after surgery.
  5. A. Upper eyelid blepharoptosis with significant dermatochalasis (eyelid skin on lashes) resulting in superior visual field deficit. Repair was performed via external ptosis repair with skin removal and orbital fat contouring. B. Favorable height and contour one month after surgery.